Archived entries for Syrah/Shiraz

Wines of Roussillon: A Chat with Sommelier Caleb Ganzer and Snooth’s Mark Angelillo

Caleb and Mark, Co-Hosts for the Session

The Roussillon wine region is all about passing along wisdom, the culmination of thousands of years of history and a place with a personality exemplifying character and honesty.  Before I attended Snooth’s Wines of Roussillon media event, hosted by Caleb Ganzer, a sommelier and Wines of Roussillon expert, and Mark Angelillo, co-founder/CEO of Snooth, I didn’t know the extent of the important story housed in this region and in these wines.

There is a misperception about the region that needs to be changed.

The Languedoc-Roussillon region spans the Mediterranean coastline from the French border of Spain to the region of Provence.  It has 700,000 acres under vines and is the single largest wine producing region in the world – eclipsing other wine regions.

The Roussillon wine region is a different and a smaller piece of the Languedoc-Roussillon located near narrow valleys around the Pyrenees.  It is open to the Mediterranean Sea to the East and three rivers, the Agly, the Tet and the Tech, define the topology of the region.  Why is this important?  Think of the differences of a boutique winery – smaller production, greater concentration on the terroir and more focus on what is in the bottle – vs. a winery that ships 2,000,000 cases of mass produced wine.  Caleb categorized it as a “gem in the rough” in a region that is known for wines for a larger mass market.

The Roussillon region, which was acquired by the French from Spain in the mid seventeenth century, was once known as a producer of sweet wines.  However, with the Old Vines of the region and more than 20 soil types in the mountainous region ranging from chalk, limestone, gravel and alluvial soils, some vineyards decided to make the pivotal shift to making dry table wines.  I would characterize most of these having concentration, extracted flavor and intensity and is one heck of a value as compared to many other Old World wines.

Here was our line-up: 

2014 Côtes du Roussillon Blanc: Michel Chapoutier, Les Vignes de Bila Haut – this is the only wine with Texas distribution and I had the opportunity to try it prior to this tasting. I absolutely adored the fact that Michel Chapoutier was one of the pioneers of providing Braille on the label – making wine accessible to all as it should be.  It was a combination of Grenache Blanc, Grenache Gris and Macabeu with a mix of tropical, citrus and floral notes and a nice minerality.

2011 Côtes du Roussillon Villages Tautavel: Gérard Bertrand, Tautavel Grand Terroir – this wine was a combination of Grenache, Syrah and Carignan.  Bertrand is known for owning some of the most premium wine estates in the South of France and is known for wines expressing the unique terroirs of the region.  The soil is chalky and I tasted black cherry, plum, boysenberry, mocha, cocoa powder and the nose was almost port-like.  Wine Writer Meg Houston Maker likened it to the French version of Malbec with its concentration, acidity and balance.  This wine would stand up well to Texas BBQ.

2013 Côtes du Roussillon Les Aspres: Château Planères, La Romanie – also grown in mountainous terroir with clay and gravel soil, this wine was made of Syrah, Mourvedre and Black Grenache.  It was a rustic Old World wine with notes of menthol, spice, black fruit and I think will be spectacular with some more time in the cellar or the right food pairing.

2013 Maury Sec: Domaine Cabirau, Cuvée Serge et Nicolas – described as the prototypical most picturesque and beautiful village that postcards are made of, this wine was nuanced, earthy and delicious.  Definitely one of my favorites from the tasting.

We then moved to the sweet wines of the region – including one made from Muscat and then to a red fortified wine of the Banyuls.  The 2011 Muscat de Rivesaltes : Domaine Cazes had notes of honeysuckle and flowers made from two different muscat grapes.  The 2014 Banyuls Rimage: Domaine La Tour Vieille, which was made of grenache, had notes of raspberry, godiva chocolate and plum.

My big takeaway was the diversity of the region, the range of styles and an increased focus on quality.


Savour South Australia Wines: Old Vines, Classic Wines, Family Lines

Terry, Michelle and Ryan Representing the Texas Wineauxs

Savour South Australia Wines came to Cafe Momentum in Dallas recently and it reiterated for me how much wine is a journey and how much I still have to learn.  When I thought about Australia, Shiraz was the grape that naturally came to mind.  But there is so, so much more.

Adelaide is the wine capital of Australia and South Australia has 18 unique wine regions including Barossa, Clare Valley, Coonawarra and McLaren Vale.  The State of South Australia consists of six regions and two territories with 1.3 million residents.  What I also didn’t know is that Australia is home to some of the oldest living vines in the world.  Even more surprising because Phylloxera has never hit the Barossa and McLaren Vale Regions, the vineyards have been producing fruit for hundreds of years.

Jennifer Lynch, the General Manager of the McLaren Vale Grape Wine and Tourism Association, kicked off the session with an overview on the geology of the region and a discussion on the changing weather patterns and soils.  The first Colony in Australia was founded in 1836 and McLaren Vale was founded by John McLaren in 1938. The first wineries were in operation by 1850.  Today there are more than 100 wineries and 250 grape growers in Australia.  It is one of the most diverse geologies in the world with diverse temperatures, different topographies and unique soils.

The McLaren Vale has four traditional seasons and is well known for reds like Shiraz, Grenache and Mourvedre, but also grows Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot and Petit Verdot.  Whites include Chardonnay, Semillon, Sauvignon Blanc and Riesling (and that is good Riesling!)

Then we moved to Barossa.  The first settlers came to Barossa in 1842 from England, Germany and Scotland.  They brought an attitude of preserving the land and a love for farming and agriculture.  Barossa is one of the custodians of the oldest continuous producers.

James March, CEO, of the Barossa Wine and Grape Association, called it “tasting history in a glass.”  He talked about growing up on a vineyard and how the topography of the Barossa Valley and Eden Valley are completely different, likening Barossa to Napa Valley and Eden Valley to Sonoma.  From warmer and drier in Barossa to wetter and cooler in the Eden Valley.  From the deep and rich soil of Barossa to the rockier soil of the Eden Valley.  The different climates make very different wines.  You can find whites like Riesling, Semillon, Chardonnay as well as Sauvignon Blanc and Viognier. Reds include Grenache, Cabernet Sauvignon, Shiraz (Syrah), and Mourvedre.

Chuck Hayward, an Australian Wine Educator, led us in a tasting of 12 unique wines from the regions.  Many were typical for what I thought of the Australian wines that I had prior.  However, there were a few surprises – especially the 2012 Torbreck Woodcutters Semillion (Barossa) that had lots of lime, acidity, green melon and a nutty texture.  It was my first tasting of Australian Semillion and it was a great, refreshing wine.

 

I also really enjoyed the Shiraz’s – the 2013 Langmeil Freedom 1843 Shiraz, 2012 Kaesler Old Bastard and the 2012 Torbreck Run Rig – all from Barossa.   Lots of black fruit, plum, raspberry, herbs and other different styles and expressions of the shiraz grape.  Another shining star with the 2010 Angove the Medhyk Shiraz (McLaren Vale) with lots of red fruit, flowers and mocha as well as getting to try older wine in the 2006 Elderton Ode de Lorraine (Barossa).  The Elderton had notes of juicy fruit, dark berry and was a great expression of the oldest soils on the planet.

Who knew that Australia had sparkling wines?  I tried the 2012 Singleback Black Bubbles (McLaren Vale) made from sparkling shiraz using the champagne region “Methode Traditionelle.”  They told us it is often served during Christmas morning and it was a fun, unexpected twist.

It was a great seminar that really showed the families, the heritage, the history, the region and the unique wines of South Australia.

 


Checkered Past Winery: A Dallas Wine Bar Where Someone Always Knows Your Name

If you are looking for a wine bar that takes itself incredibly seriously and is full of folks discussing the esoteric qualities of wines, Checkered Past Winery is not for you.  If you are looking for your next neighborhood “Cheers experience,” but with a mix of Texas and international wines (and beer too), belly on up to the bar and let Sandro DiSanto , co-founder, owner and winemaker and Carolynne Chancellor, manager and vineyard owner, change your mind about wine snobbery and Texas wines.

So I’ve told you what Checkered Past Winery isn’t.  So what is it?  It’s an urban wine pub in the South Side neighborhood which features quality Texas wines, locally brewed beer, and great wines from around the world with really great folks running the show.  Checkered Past actually has its own wines made in Texas.  We tried several of the wines – the albarino, the viognier and the syrah.  I liked them all, but really enjoyed the two whites.

The winery, which opened in early December of last year on Prohibition Day, is themed around Mods and Rockers, two different British youth subcultures of the early to mid 60’s and 70’s.  The rocker subculture was based upon motorcycles, leather jackets and 50’s rock and roll.  The mod subculture was based around fashion (think Mad Men), music and many rode scooters.

There are a lot of things that make Checkered Past Winery unique including the fact that Sandro is a winemaker making his owned branded wines that you can try at the winery.  His philosophy is to make “balanced wines without faults and pair well with food and friends.”  Carolynne is also growing grapes that will eventually be used in the branded wines.  There is a list of fellow Texas winemakers (higher end) that are considered “friends” as well as seven tap wines as well as local beers and ciders in addition to the international wine list.

Sandro wanted to build an urban winery after commuting more than 80 miles each way to work and wanted to change the traditional model of having to travel to a winery.  The Cedars neighborhood was chosen because it was creative and artistic.  Walking into the building, you see that influence.  The staff at Checkered Past Winery designed the entire space themselves except for the paint you see on the walls.  You see old metal, scooter and motorcycle parts that showcase the theme.  The music also is a mix of reggae, ska, jazz and punk – depending on the night and live bands are prevalent.

Wines are available by the glass, bottle and through the wine club.  It’s free to join and you are only committed to one month for two bottles – usually around $40.  You won’t find wines on the center shelf of the grocery store – it’s a cool and eclectic selection.

And, the food.  A picture says one thousand words and I’m positing all the delicious things that we ate.  This is a wine bar that is meant to be a place to demystify wine and become your next neighborhood destination.


Malai Kitchen: Laser Focused on the Consumer Food & Wine Experience

In Texas, there are too many restaurants that refuse to take the same care with their wine lists as they do with their food menus.  Five years ago, after an experience with one of Dallas’ “venerable” institutions, I let loose with my vent and the idea that Dallas diners deserved so much better.

Then restaurants like Malai Kitchen come around and bring back hope that a dining experience should involve equal attention to food as well as the wines that bring out the full flavors of the menu.  Almost two years ago, I was invited by Yasmine and Braden Wages to try the 20 wines by the glass they had carefully chosen to compliment their Asian menu. Here was my experience.

I loved that they challenged convention and had suggested pairings to make the dining experience easier and to take the guesswork out for consumers.  Fast forward to December of 2015, and the Wages had added flights of red and white wines.  For $22, consumers receive four white wines or four red wines equaling about two full glasses of wines.  Because the menu is so diverse, it was a great way to experience a wide range of food and wines.  The process also allows some discoveries about non-traditional pairings.

A few weeks ago, I wrote about our Texas Wineaux group, a group of wine lovers who have gathered together to taste wines, eat great food and generally have a great time.  When I received the invitation from Malai, I knew that this group would so enjoy the experience.

Our line-up looked a little like this.

The White Flight:

  • 2014 Selby Sauvignon Blanc
  • 2014 Chateau Routas Rose
  • 2012 Les Vignes d’Alexandre Chateauneuf-du-Pape
  • 2014 Kessler “R” Riesling

We paired these with Vietnamese meatballs, Ahi Tuna tartare, crab curry spicy dip and coconut soup.  The Selby and the tuna tartare as well as the coconut soup were fantastic pairings.  The Chateau Routas and the spicy crab dip was amazing.  While we all agreed the Kessler Riesling was a great match, it was the safer choice of all of the other wines.

The Red Flight:

  • 2006 Chateau Compassant Bordeaux
  • 2014 Bodegas Filon Granacha
  • 2011 Renwood Old Vine Zinfandel
  • 2012 Bell Syrah

We paired this with a number of dishes including the Iron Pot Green Curry Chicken, the Snapper special and the Drunken Noodles.  The Chateau Compassant Bordeaux was the clear winner with both the curry and the snapper dishes.

Malai Kitchen continues to be an affordable, well concepted and fantastic bright spot in Dallas’ dining scene run by one of the nicest couples out there.  And for those of you who live closer to Southlake, you will soon have a Malai Kitchen to call your own as well.  Try the coconut cream pie – it is worth breaking your New Year’s Resolution.


May the Force be with Texas: And It Can’t Come Too Quickly

Every month I receive calls monthly from wine producers from all over the world anxious to break into the Texas marketplace.  Texas is consistently ranked in the top five wine drinking states.  Because of this, wineries – especially the boutique ones – are clamoring to get distribution in our arduous three-tier system, which requires that producers can sell their products only to wholesale distributors who then sell to retailers, and only retailers may sell to consumers.

My friend Bob Silver, who has been a part of the Washington wine industry many years, reached out to introduce me to Force Majeure, a boutique winery located in Woodinville, Washington, in the Red Mountain region, which specializes in single-vineyard Bordeaux and Rhone-inspired wines. According to the winery, ’Force Majeure’ describes the relentless, powerful elements of Nature that form the terroir of the vineyard. It also identifies the ‘unstoppable force’ initiated when the highest level of viticulture is combined with the highest level of winemaking talent”.  Bob asked if I would try the wine. 

Sure I’ll try it, I replied.  About a month went by and I finally opened the bottles – the 2012 Force Majeure Red Mountain Cabernet Sauvignon, which was full of chocolate, cassis, earthy notes and elegance.  We followed up with the 2012 Force Majeure Red Mountain Syrah, with rich notes of dark red fruit, raspberry, earth, spice and minerality.  One of the joys – and curses – of being a wine blogger is that I try so many wines it’s hard to evoke the type of reaction that I experienced from both of these wines.

I personally am on a mission to get them to Texas so you can try them.


Wine, Women, Food and Seattle: The Perfect Storm

When my work life and wine life intersect, I always bask in the glow.  I have been incredibly lucky to be accepted into the Executive Women’s Roundtable, an exclusive C-level women’s leadership organization that is run through the Dallas Chamber of Commerce.  The women are amazing – it’s a who’s who of women who leave me in awe every time that I am in a room with them.

The Executive Women’s Roundtable Group at JM Cellars

Annually, we have a weekend leadership retreat designed to be a time of learning, city exploration, laughter and networking.  This year we headed to Seattle.  Yes, the land of Washington Wine, which I fell in love with about five years ago at #wbc10.

Ian and Laura MacNeil

This trip allowed me to explore (briefly) a wine region that I did not have a chance to visit the last time I was there – Woodinville.  But first, we needed to explore vodka.  Ian MacNeil launched the Glass Distillery in 2012 to introduce his flagship spirit, Glass Vodka, to the public.  The shop includes a gorgeous exhibition of glass and on our visit was coupled with a tasting of four types of vodka.  Three were flavored, but the pure Glass Vodka was delicious, smooth and all about style.  This made a girl that wasn’t necessarily a vodka fan, a vodka fan.

Luly Wang Creation for the Vogel Alcove Gala

After a series of meetings and networking events, (if you want the outfit of the year, check out Luly Yang, one of the most fun designers I’ve seen in a long time), we headed to a morning tour of Pike Place Market. 

We had a private tour at the Dale Chihuly Boathouse.  It was awesome to see Chihuly’s glass vision come to life from an aquarium to his private pool to the best dining room ever.  It was a blast from the past to see what inspired the gorgeous designs that have become the standard of glass couture.

John Bigelow

Then the games begin.  I’m never a tour bus winery kind of gal, so I’m going to focus on the two “off the beaten path” wineries that I really enjoyed out of the three we toured.  Our first was JM Cellars, which is considered a private arboretum located on a hill named “Bramble Bump.”  John Bigelow, the incredibly charismatic and passionate winemaker, who had such an infectious excitement for his wines and the story of his family, made us all fall in love with his story and the property.  These guys make 500 cases a year – small and boutique in style.  The 2012 Vineyard Estate red and the 2012 Syrah were my favorite wines that I tried.

Brian Cade

Our next stop was Sparkman Cellars where we spent time with Brian Cade, the general manager.  I loved the vision, “work with the finest ingredients known to man, craft it from something truly real and share it with people that want to drink it.”  Sir, may I have another… I really liked everything that I tried.  The fact that the wine club is named after Johnny Cash’s “Ring of Fire” resonated.  But sadly, to refrain a sad yet often stated theme, the wines are not yet available in Texas.  I hate you three-tier ridiculous legal system.  We are all missing out.

Anytime I can combine time with a group of awe inspiring women combined with the amazing city of Seattle paired with a region of wines that I just want to spend time exploring, that means one of the best weekend’s ever.

 


Two Lands Wine: California Craftsmanship with Australian Character

My love for Ehren Jordan’s wine began with a yellow balloon tied to a non-descript mailbox in Napa Valley.  We were tasting at another winery when I asked my paradoxical question – “if you weren’t working here, what is the first place that you’d stop and taste the wine.”  That brought us to his newly debuted Failla Winery, which was so new it was still unmarked except with that yellow balloon, where I had an amazing conversation with Jordan.  We talked about his vision, why he made the wines he made and the importance of boutique, small production wines.

Hickin and Jordan

Fast forward about seven years later and I was invited to an online digital tasting with Jordan and Bernard Hickin, Jacob’s Creek Chief Winemaker from Barossa to taste the newly debuted Two Lands label.  The two winemakers created a cross-collaboration combining the boutique wine experience at a price point not normally delivered under $14.

Jordan talked about combining, “California craftsmanship with Australian character to create a depth of experience.”  He also discussed how he was blown away when he visited Australia for the first time after having several members of his wine team talk about the great experience they had working on the region. 

We tried four wines in the line-up and I fell in love with two.  I am usually not a Pinot Grigio fan, but the 2013 Two Lands Pinot Grigio has notes of stone fruit, red apple and acid that gave it a nice balance.  The 2013 Two Lands Shiraz was delicious with notes of blueberries, cocoa, herbs, black cherry and chocolate. 

These two value wines bring together the best of both worlds at a price point that makes it easy to afford.

 

 


Twas the Night Before …. A December to Remember? Maybe?

‘Twas the Christmas season and all through the abode, my liver was working overtime to keep up with the load.  Much to my delighted eye did appear, some of the best wines that I’ve seen all year. 

Come Dom, Come Schramsberg, Come Pierre Peters. Come Charles Heidsieck.  As far as the eye can see, there are full tables of delicious bubbly. 

Come Clos Pegase.  Come 24 Vineyards.  Come Terra Valentine.  Come Coquerel. Come Barnett.  Come Caymus Select.  Come Quilceda Creek.  Come Larkmead. Come Tercero.  But I’m not done yet.

The bubbles have sparkled, the magnums shone bright.  The posts have been many – each and every night.  Merry Christmas to all, and in the next year, the added bulge I will fight.


Mexican Wines?: What I Found on a Rainy Day in Mexico

A Non-Rain View of Punta Mita

We recently went to Punta Mita where we stayed at the Four Seasons for an awesome family trip.  We were ready for some surf, sea and fun, but the weather decided not to comply with a couple days of torrential downpours.  While our kiddo decided to do fun indoor activities, my husband and I braved the weather and went to hang at the Nunca Pool Bar.  That’s where I started my conversation with Armando, who taught me about wines from the Valle de Guadalupe/Baja California, Mexico, which is located less than two hours away from San Diego.

My uncle, who did a long-stint at Gallo, had talked about this region for years and told me about how it was an “up and coming Napa” in its own right.  Armando was also passionate about the region and we tasted through four wines that were diverse and unique.

Wine has been made in this region for hundreds of years and over the past twenty folks in the industry have taken notice.  The red wines produced here include Cabernet Sauvignon, Cabernet Franc, Merlot, Zinfandel, Nebbiolo, Syrah, Tempranillo, Malbec, Carignan and Grenache.

My line up included:

  • 2012 Tinto Mexicano, a blend of cabernet sauvignon, petit syrah and grenache.  It took a while to open up and was my least favorite of those that I tried that day. 
  • 2102 Santos Brujos Tempranillo, this was a nice expression of tempranillo and matched well with the food we had in front of us.
  • 2012 Monasterio, Sinfonia de Tintos, one of my two favorites. I loved the blend, the balance, the black fruit, the tea, the plum and the earthiness of this wine.
  • 2010 L.A. Cetto Nebbiolo Private Reserve, this was a great first try of Mexico’s Nebbiolo grape.  It had notes of blackberry, earthiness and made me crave something that was tomato based as my entrée.  

This region is definitely one that is worth exploration – especially when you are not paying Four Season’s by the glass bar prices.


 


Come for the Private Events: Stay for the Conference

The Wine Bloggers Conference was awesome, but it’s hard for 300 plus people to have the kind of conversations that lead to the stories that I love to tell.  Ironically, of the 39 pages of notes that I took during my time in Santa Barbara, only 12 of them came from my time at #wbc14.  I had the same trend with my photos as well. 

There were many highlights from #wbc14 including being able to catch up with many dear friends.  For $95, this is the deal of the century.  I think that there are a lot of bloggers like me that would pay more for some of the intimate experiences we were able to have by going off the beaten path. 

Our keynote at #wbc was Corbett Barr of Fizzle, a site that helps people make their thing online (their words, not mine).  Corbett had spot on advice for many of us who work to balance the content of our blog with what our readers find valuable.  He had six tenants that he outlined. They were all basic, but a good reminder:

  • Character trumps credentials.  You guys know that all I try to do is tell my story of wine. I have never claimed to be an expert or the right credentials.
  • Differentiate – does the world really need another wine review site?  While I review the wines that I sample and enjoy, I don’t think you guys really want a Dallas Wine Chick rating of these wines.
  • What if you work hard, but don’t get results?  Then you need to re-evaluate what you are doing, get out of your comfort zone and solicit feedback.  Kind of like what you should do when you find yourself in this situation in your life.
  • What is my content is good, but no one is reading?  Hope is not a marketing strategy, he said (love this).  I remember in the early days of starting my blog, I felt like the only folks reading were related to me.  But, I kept plugging and you guys came (thank you).
  • Your blog is not a business.  The goal of Dallas Wine Chick is not to make money, but to fuel my passion for wine.  Check.
  • 1+1=3.  Meaning that you are the average of the people you spend time with – get engaged, make friends with other bloggers, brainstorm with them.  Engage in a Mastermind 101 session where you talk about ideas, consort on great subjects and share your experiences.  I have the QBP (queen bitches posse) that have done this informally for some time now.  And, I loved my column with @NormalWine about the World Cup.  More to come there.

This was followed by a panel of winemakers from Santa Barbara County moderated by one of my favorite winemakers, Larry Schaffer from Tercero Wines.  The presentation wasn’t working so I have to rely on my notes.  We had some of the stalwarts – Ken Brown from Ken Brown Wines, Richard Sanford of Alma Rosa Winery, Bob Lindquist of Qupe and Richard Longoria of Longoria Wines.  They underscored their passion about the region and how their love of the region is answered in their wines.  As Ken Brown said, “the best is yet to come here.  We have a commitment to make quality wines and are lucky to do it in such a beautiful and special place.”

We did the usual speed tasting, which is something you either love or hate.  I love getting to try wines that I would never be exposed to, but I truly wish we could strike box and supermarket wine (Bandit) from the line-up. But, hanging with Larry from Tercero, I did laugh through the entire question session.  For the whites, my favorites included the 2012 Consilence Viognier, 2012 Jordan Chardonnay, 2013 Buttonwood Zingy Sauvignon Blanc and the 2013 Grassini Sauvignon Blanc.  The red favs included 2012 Labyrinth Pinot Noir, the 2012 Garnet Pinot Noir and the 2011 Vineyard 511 Cabernet.  Delicious. 

We moved to a breakout session from Winebow – When the Sum is Greater than its Parts: Wine Blends from Around the World.  Sheri Sauter Morano, MW, who has taught other #wbc Winebow events, was great and underscored the importance of making sure blends only occur when the resulting wine is superior to each component.  We tried seven blends that were somewhat obscure – I wish there was one that would have been easier to guess in the line-up, but I was happy to learn.  I did okay guessing region, but some of the blending elements were unknown to me.  We tried the following wines – the 2008 Juve Y Camps Reserva de la Familia, 2013 Tasca D’Almerita Regaleali Bianco Sicilia IGT, 2013 Weingut Wieninger Wiener Gemischter Satz, 2012 Fattoria Le Pupille Morelino di Scansano DOCG, 2011 Wine & Soul Quinta da Manoella Red, 2011 Bodega Renacer Enamore and 2010 Cousino-Macul Finis Terrae.

Then the madness began.  The buses were leaving for the Santa Barbara blogger excursions.  This is tough because you have large groups of friends who want to hang together, but the buses only take a certain number of people.  I was lucky enough to get on a fun bus and with a great group of people.  This was when I was able to observe Jeff Kralick in his native habitat – first pole dancing on the bus and then with a sabering incident.  For the record, I did see him successfully saber a bottle at the Jordan afterparty.

We went to Zaca Mesa Vineyards as well as Andrew Murray Vineyards, where many of the winemakers we have gotten to know around the region poured wines that they couldn’t pour en masse.  We had a bus that broke down (and was quickly replaced) by the region, great food, awesome wines and lots of laughs. 

One of my favorite sessions the next day was the Ballard Canyon Grower Producer Wineries where we did a deep dive into the fabulous syrahs of the region.  We started with a bevy of jokes about the misunderstood grape – what’s the difference between a case of syrah and a case of pneumonia?  Much easier to get rid of pneumonia.  People, wake up – these are fabulous wines. 

We learned that Ballard County has “somewhereness” – meaning it has unique climate, chalk and limestone soil, great fruit and a sense of place.  Patrick Comiskey from Wine & Spirits, along with a panel of eight winemakers, talked and tasted the group through the wines from Beckmen Vineyards, Larner Vineyard, Kimsey Vineyard, Jonata Wines, Harrison Clarke, Rusack and Stolpman Vineyards.  Sarrloos and Sons also attended, but had sold out of its syrah.  I was able to rectify getting my hands on some of their wines at an afterparty I’ll write about in the next post.   

Mike Larner from Larner Vineyards talked about how there is clarity in the wines.  Keith Saarloos talked about the soulfulness of syrah.  They are both right – there is depth.  And spice.  And passion.  And herbs.  And flowers.  And big berry flavors.  And art.  And just loveliness.

That theme continued with any wine that I tried from the region.  I’m putting my theory to action in Dallas and trying any wine that I can find with a Santa Barbara delineation.  So far, I’ve impressed my friends with a Grenache and Syrah that I ordered on a leap of faith.

    




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