Archived entries for French Wines

Another Edition of the Round Up of Wine: Six Countries, Twenty Four Wines

It’s time for another wine round up column filled with some of my favorite samples.  This time I tried 46 wines from six countries with 24 making the cut today.

Sparkling

NV Ferrari Rose Sparking – I’ve had the amazing opportunity of visiting Ferrari back in April.  To read more, click here.  Ferrari Trento was awarded the title of “Sparkling Wine Producer of the Year” in this year’s edition of The Champagne & Sparkling Wine World Championships, the second time it has won this title.  I tasted wild strawberries, cassis, floral notes and fresh baked bread.

NV Gloria Ferrer Brut Rose — I had to chance to try this back in June at a lunch with Steven Urberg, the winemaker.  My notes at the time – stone fruit, apple, honey, vanilla, crème brulee and black cherry.  Still held true.  Here’s the conversation from that day here.

NV Torresella Prosecco DOC – very drinkable with notes of pear, apple, almond and almost a honey baked bread.

Whites

Sauvignon Blanc

2016 Terrunyo Sauvignon Blanc – this is a tasty sauvignon blanc with lots of minerality, lime, grapefruit and herbal notes.

2015 Amici Sauvignon Blanc – zesty is a great way to describe this wine.  There was a burst of passion fruit, pear, flowers and lemongrass.  It also had a nice minerality.

2016 Hess Select Sauvignon Blanc – Hess is always dependable choice for Sauvignon Blanc. Notes of lemons, lime, green apple, grapefruit and white pepper.

Chardonnay

2015 Jon Nathaniel Lavender Hill Vineyard Chardonnay – this was one of the top chardonnays that I have tried all year.  I tasted a balanced wine with honey, vanilla, pear, apple, graham cracker and spice.  You got a little creaminess, you got a little oak, but most importantly, you received a great balance in this wine.

2016 Flora Springs Chardonnay – this was a very easy drinking chardonnay with notes of crème brulee, stone fruit, citrus, green apple, lemon, spice and vanilla.

2015 Feudo Zirtari Inzolia Chardonnay – this was a value-oriented chardonnay that had a nice balance of fruit and flowers with some nuttiness.

Other Varietals

2016 Tenuta Sassoregale Vermentino Maremma Toscana DOC – very easy drinking with lots of citrus, lemon, lime, yellow apple and lots of fruit.  A nice austerity.

2015 Kettmeir Pinot Bianco – green apple, pear, minerality and floral notes.

NV Locations by Dave Phinney CA-4 – this first white California blend features Chardonnay, Sauvignon Blanc, Viognier, and Roussanne grapes from Napa, Sonoma, and Mendocino.  Lots of stone fruit with tropical, citrus and oak notes.  I could spot California instantly from my first sip.

NV Locations by Dave Phinney Corse – this 100 percent Vermentino was delicious and one of my favorite Locations wines to date.  I tasted Meyer lemon, pear, lime, a nuttiness, herbal notes and almost a honey texture.  This also had a nice minerality and I couldn’t stop sipping it.

Reds

Bordeaux

2012 Chateau Moulin De La Roquille Bourdeaux – this was definitely a value Bordeaux and it needed a little time to open in the glass.  I tasted red currant, cherry, cassis, Asian spice, cedar plank and dried flowers.

Merlot

 

2015 Rombauer Merlot (Carneros) – very juicy with blueberry, plum, cedar, cherry and fig newton.  It’s a big merlot, but it’s a Rombauer.

Cabernet Sauvignon

2014 Amici Cabernet Sauvignon – each year I smile when my Amici samples come in because they are consistently good.  I tasted blackberry, currant, chocolate, violets, herbs and licorice.

2013 Rombauer Vineyards Cabernet Sauvignon Diamond Selection – Rombauer is known for its very big wines, which defines its wine making style.  This wine, however, I could only define as an elegant grab yourself a “chaise lounge, recline and take a sip” kinda of wine.  As I raised the inky black glass I tasted blackberry, cassis, licorice, cherries, blueberries, chocolate, vanilla, dried flowers and mocha.  Give this time in your cellar and it will reward you.

2015 Z Alexander Brown Uncaged Cabernet Sauvignon – this wine comes from Zac Brown, the musician. I tasted blackberry, plum, Asian spice, cherry, pepper and it had a nice balance.

Pinot Noir

2015 Diora La Petite Grace Pinot Noir – I had not had many Monterrey Pinot Noirs, but if Diora was any indication, I’ve been missing out.  This was an elegant and soft pinot that had earthy notes of dark cherry, mocha, spice and chocolate.

Other/Red Blend

 

2014 Troon Vineyard Estate Tannat – this is an example of why tannat can stand on its own and Troon does it well.  I tasted notes of blueberry, blackberry, graphite, pepper, herbs and a nice earthiness.

2014 Smith Hook Proprietary Red Blend – blackberry, blueberry, cassis, cherry, oak, smoke and vanilla.

2014 Trivento Amado Sur – black fruit, strawberries, cherries and a nice spice makes this an easy drinking red right in time for football season.

2014 Finca San Blas Lomalta Crianza – red fruit, balsamic and a little spice.  This is a well priced wine worth seeking out and a region in Spain worthy of attention.

2015 Messina Hof Sangiovese “Artist Series” – paired well with food.  I tasted black and red fruit, leather and spice.

Dessert/Port

Six Grapes is one of Graham’s Original Port blends.  This Reserve Porto is dessert in a glass with plum and chocolate covered cherries.


Rosé: Rekindling a Love Affair with Small Boutique Wines

For a long time, rosé was my Rodney Dangerfield of wines.  As hard and as many as I tried, I just couldn’t find one that didn’t taste like the watermelon Jolly Ranchers that used to stick to my braces on the playground.  That might have been fine in seventh grade (well except from my dentist’s perspective) but not a characteristic of the wine I was hoping to drink.  A group of good friends, I’ll call them Team Rosé, went on a personal mission to show me what I had been missing and I’m happy to report that I saw the light several years ago.

So when #winestudio picked the theme of rosé , I knew that we’d have a combination of Old World and New World boutique wines that I was excited to try.

We started with the wines of Jean-Claude Mas from Mas Domaines in the Languedoc.

Domaines Paul Mas owns more than 600 hectares of vineyards and works in partnership with grape growers across an additional 1312 hectares of vines in the Languedoc.  They are known for having a range of grape varieties and for the diverseness of the terroir in those vineyards.  Jean-Claude Mas, the fourth-generation grower talked about how Langedoc has become a treasure for producing fine rosé  due to the variety of soils and amount of varietals used.  We tasted three of his rosés  — all priced under $16.  The NV Côté Mas Crémant de Limoux Rosé Brut St. Hilaire Languedoc (I loved this sparkling), the 2016 Coté Mas Rosé Aurore​ Sud de France and the 2016 Arrogant Frog Rosé.  All delicious and a complete find for the price.

I already wrote about the Arinzano rosé , so I won’t spend time other than to say this is where the wine officially fit into the program.


We then moved to the 2016 Bonterra Rosé from Mendocino, a blend of Grenache, Sangiovese, Nebbiolo and priced around $16.  Bonterra is known for its organically farmed wines, its focus on the lands and the care and craftsmanship it puts into each wine.  This dry Provencal-style rosé was delightful and got rave reviews, but appears to be completely sold out.  Winemaker Sebastian Donosa talked in detail about the biodynamic approach and what makes Bonterra’s style different.

Our last wine was a 2016 Conn Creek Rosé of Malbec from Antica Vineyard, Atlas Peak, Napa Valley, which my husband billed as the “favorite rosé that he has ever had,” a big compliment from a man who has drank a lot of bottles of wine.

Conn Creek winery was founded nearly 40 years ago in Napa, focused on Cabernet Sauvignon and Bordeaux varieties.  Mike McGrath has been Conn Creek since the 1980s and holds one of the titles for being the longest tenured Napa Valley winemakers working for just one winery.  I was familiar with Conn Creek, but I honestly did not understand the innovation and small lots of wine that happening.  Rest assured I will be paying more attention in the future.


Another Wine Round Up: Belated Edition

Once again, I am completely behind on my wine round ups.  I only have myself to blame.  I had the vision of doing a rosé roundup and found myself with about 75 roses to drink (as well as a dedicated #winestudio program), so this is going to a series of round ups or you’d be reading about 150 wines (with a total of 300 under review, so advance apologies to the PR folks who sent these my way).  Figured that would not be fun to read, let alone daunting to write, so we’ll take it by varietal and today I’ll cover 33 of them.

Rosé

 

2016 Caves d’Esclans Whispering Angel Rosé – this is a fabulous expression of Provence rosé and is a critic favorite for a reason.  Grapefruit, minerality, peach and blood orange.  Absolutely delicious.

2016 Aridus Rosé – this Arizona wine was new to me and was a fun new find.  I tasted tangerine, peach, strawberry and spice.

2016 Alta Vista Rosé – made to be an everyday, easy drinking fruity rosé with notes of Bing cherry, roses and a nice minerality.

2016 Caposaldo Rosé – notes of strawberries, raspberries, cherries with floral and mineral notes.

2016 Louis Jadot Rosé – notes of flowers, raspberry and currant with spice.

2016 Maison Saleya Rosé – This was the first one to go at the tasting.  Notes of tangerine, raspberry, cherry, roses and a little spice on the end.  Definitely the crowd favorite.

2016 Masi Rosa dei Masi – juicy berry, cherry and almost a richness balanced with a nice minerality.

2016 Martin Ray Rosé of Pinot Noir – I tasted stone fruit, cherry, strawberry and citrus notes.  Small production and appears to be sold out, but definitely seek out if you can find it.

2016 Noble Vines Rosé – notes of raspberry, citrus, tangerine and roses.

2016 Ferraton Père & Fils, Samorëns Côtes du Rhône, Rosé – notes of flowers, peach, melon and citrus as well as stone fruit with a balanced minerality.

2016 Marqués de Riscal Rosado – strawberry, cherry, raspberry and rose with a nice mineralogy.

Sparkling

This was my first sparkling from Utiel-Requena, which is an appellation in Spain’s Bobal Valencia region.  I learned that while 95% of the 35,000 hectares of vines are planted to red grape varieties, the Bobal is the star of the show here.

2014 Pago de Tharsys Bobal Unico Blanc de Negre Brut – this was a sparkling wine made with the Bobal grape.  I got yeastiness, apples, almonds, pears and notes of citrus.   I loved the minerality and the freshness of this wine.

I also tasted (from another region) Vineyard SEROL Turbullent Sparkling Rosé – it was a berry explosion with notes of pear and white fruit.  A very refreshing and fun expression of sparkling wine.

Whites

2014 Troon Vermentino – let’s start out by saying that I love this wine and the fact that Craig Camp is involved, makes it even better.  I tasted cherry, citrus, hazelnut, ginger, lemon curd and floral notes along with a great acidity.

2014 Cecchi La Mora Vermentino – an easy drinking white wine with notes of papaya, pear, apple and a nice acidity.

2015 Marques Casa Concha Chardonnay – this smooth drinking Chardonnay was chock full of pear, quince, almonds, spice and candied citrus.

2015 Adler Fels The Eagle Rock Chardonnay – notes of tropical fruit, apples, vanilla, pears and stone fruit.  A well-balanced and elegant chardonnay.

2016 Crowded House Sauvignon Blanc – notes of lime zest, citrus, grassiness and a nice minerality.

2016 Martin Ray Sauvignon Blanc – a refreshing wine with lemon, floral notes, tropical fruits and a nice minerality.

2015 Martin Ray The Tower – made from Rhone varietals, I tasted tropical fruit, melon, flowers, honeycomb, lemon and grapefruit and a minerality that kept it refreshing.

2015 A2O Albarino – this was a true expression of albarino with minerality and notes of peach, melon, honey and a little herbal note.

2015 Torresella Pinot Grigio – a balanced pinot grigio with pear, apple and mineral notes.

2014 Naia Verdejo — notes of citrus, apricot, tropical fruit and flowers.

Reds

2013 Tarantas Tempranillo – another wine from the Utiel-Requena region (see sparkling section above).  This wine had notes of cranberry, blackberry, spice, oregano, earth and cherry.  A very drinkable tempranillo from this new regional discovery.

 

2014 Bodegas Hispano Suizas Bassus Pinot Noir – from the Utiel-Requena region and who knew Pinot Noir would be part of this region?  Almost jammy it is so fruit forward.  Lots of currant, floral notes and a nice spiciness makes this a very easy drinking wine.

2014 Alder Fels Pinot Noir – this lush pinot has notes of red cherry, earth, herbs and licorice.  Definitely one of the favorites.

2014 Aridus Petite Sirah – this was a fun petite sirah to try and another surprise from Arizona.  Loads of berry, cassis, mocha and a touch of vanilla.

Mezzacorona Vigneti Cliffhanger Vineyards Proprietary Red (NV) – red and black fruit combined with spice, oak and vanilla make this a bigger wine that begs for food.

2007 Mezzacorona NOS Riserva – I really enjoyed this wine with notes of blackberry, black cherry, charcoal, pepper and spice.  Over the course, it kept opening nicely and was a great match with the appetizers we were snacking on.

2012 Praxis Lagrein – this was a new find for me and I was so glad for the discovery.  A mix of cherry and black fruit with coffee, chocolate and herbal notes.

2016 Farraton Pere & Fils Cotes du Rhone Samorens – this solid red offered notes of raspberry, cherry, licorice and spice.  It was very approachable and drinkable.

Other – Wines/Spirits in a Can

Bushido Premium Sake — A sake in a can?  Yes, the convenience era has come to a head and now cans run prevalent – sometime with varying successes.  Bushido’s Way of the Warrior sake can, contains premium Ginjo Genshu sake.  I tasted red fruit, Asian pear along with floral notes and some spice.  I think this can will convert some newbies to sake as it as a refreshing and unique way to experience sake.

Backpack Rosé – boat wine in a box… these cans of rosé were very drinkable and I tasted strawberry, white stone fruit with some floral notes.


The Art of Wine: When Passion and a Business Plan Intersect

 

Ariane Garcia, Owner, The Art of Wine

She’s a philantropher. A health care executive.  And the owner of The Art of Wine, a neighborhood wine bar in Preston Hollow.  Ariane Garcia found herself with a business plan to write for her graduate studies at Southern Methodist University and The Art of Wine was born.

I had a chance to visit The Art of Wine and chat with Ariane about her vision for the business.  It’s a retail boutique, by-the-glass bar, and local artist display with a goal of providing off the beaten path as well as better known labels.   I found Billecart-Salmon to Hoopes Vineyards to Guidobono to Long Meadow Ranch as well as the better-known labels.

The wine bar also offers a mix of wine and painting classes as well as wine education.  It’s a great neighborhood gathering place to grab a glass of wine and toast to the week’s victories.


History, Heritage, Honor and Hard Work: A Conversation with Murrieta’s Well Winery

The latest Snooth tasting focused on the Livermore Valley, a pivotal region in shaping California’s wine industry back in the 1880s when it received America’s first international gold medal for wine in 1889 at the Paris Exposition.  Livermore Valley wineries were the first to label Chardonnay, Sauvignon Blanc and Petite Sirah and approximately 80 percent of California’s Chardonnay vines trace roots back to a Livermore valley clone.

It was great to taste with one of the iconic wineries from the region, Murrieta’s Well, which is affiliated with pioneer winemaker, C.H. Wente, who bought the vineyard from the original owner, Louis Mel in 1933.  Snooth’s Chief Taster Mark Angelillo and Murrieta’s Well’s Winemaker Robbie Meyer took us through a portfolio of six diverse wines.

Murrieta’s Well is one of California’s original wineries and has been growing grapes since the vineyard was first planted with cuttings from Chateau d’Yquem and Chateau Margaux vineyards.  Talk about some aristocratic rootstalk.

The 500-acre vineyard features three different soil types, a range of elevations and microclimates and produces 21 different varietals.  Mark stated, “you can cherry pick based on the different characteristics and terroir to blend diverse and exceptional wines.”

Murrieta’s Well focuses on terroir-driven, limited production wine blends and the original gravity flow winery is the site of the tasting room today.  In 1990, Philip Wente and Sergio Traverso renamed the winery and wine label, Murrieta’s Well.  The name pays homage to Joaquin Murrieta, a gold rush bandit, who discovered the estate in the 1800s.

Murrieta’s Well focuses on all estate, small-batch and small lot wines.  Michael talked about “the art of blending based on the best of the vintage.”  He spoke about being able to make the best blend that ties in with the best aromatics.  This happens by farming each acre by hand because it is unique.

We tried the following line-up:

2015 Murrieta’s Well The Whip – was first released in honor of the winery’s 20th anniversary in 2010 and is a white Bordeaux blend.   I tasted melon, peach and floral notes.

2014 Murrieta’s Well The Spur – this wine was also released in honor of the winery’s 20th anniversary in 2010 and is a red Bordeaux blend.  I tasted vanilla, tobacco, cranberry, spice and blue fruit.

2016 Murrieta’s Well Dry Rose – I tasted notes of strawberry, watermelon, berry and floral notes.

2016 Murrieta’s Well Muscat Canelli – this wine had a burst of citrus followed by white stone fruit and flowers.

2014 Murrieta’s Well Cabernet Franc – notes of both red and black fruit, herbs, spice, vanilla and toast.

2014 Murrieta’s Well Merlot – notes of mocha, cassis, red fruit, vanilla and blue fruit.

To follow along with the tasting, click here.

Murrieta’s Well is a winery with a place in history that is working grape by grape to make sure it has a legacy that continues into the next century.


Marie-Christine Osselin Reflects on Moët & Chandon’s Grape to Glass Quality

Marie-Christine Osselin

When Marie-Christine Osselin looks at a glass (not champagne flute, mind you) of Moët & Chandon, she thinks about the multitude of steps it took to get from the grower to harvest to the wine making process to the bottle. Marie is the Wine Quality Manager for Moët & Chandon and has the daunting job of making sure what ends up in your glass.  Just one vineyard, for example, involves an effort of 1,500 acres of vineyards, 450 growers, a slew workers under the cellar master’s guidance, cutting-edge technology and a constant fight against nature and oxidation.  And these are big stakes as Moët & Chandon currently has 20 percent of the champagne market with an eye on the number one slot.

The company, which is a French champagne house is also co-owner of Louis Vuitton.  Moët & Chandon has set up its operating model over its 2,800 acres of vineyards where it can select from a wide range of grapes and select the best blends for each champagne.  Marie used terms like “freshness, fruitiness, seductive and sustainable.”  In fact, Moët & Chandon has been making champagne since 1743 and is committed to preserving the land but always using innovation to improve product quality.

That is why Marie had on her other hat – explaining champagne around the world by scheduling technical tastings for the trade in Dallas, Houston, Atlanta and New York.  This was her first trip to the US, with a task to evangelize the spirit of fine craftsmanship that is synonymous with the brand.  But her other reason was much more important – Moët & Chandon wants to completely understand the US marketplace as it introduces its array of products to meet the palate of the marketplace.

We started off our Monday morning (technically could have been brunch time) with several champagnes.  The blends vary but the three grapes remain the same – pinot noir, chardonnay and pinot meunier.

Our first was the Moët & Chandon Rose Imperial, a very approachable, lovely wine produced for consumers to enjoy every day.  The wine is a very intense color due to the thermos vinification process.  The wines are aged for 24 months.  I tasted lots of red fruit, floral notes with a little spice.   Marie described it as “an old friend you haven’t seen in a long time, but can instantly pick up with and have the same pleasure and enjoyment.”

We moved to the 2008 Moët & Chandon Grand Vintage Rose described as the “act of freedom of the chef de cave.”  The vintage must express an exceptional year and the chef decides the vintage based on his assessment of what was best for the harvest.  The wine will never be replicable and will always be unique. These wines become part of the Maison’s Grand Vintage Collection, a library of wines that date back to 1842.

So how does one react to a blend of 100 different wines in one glass?  Just savor and enjoy this amazing composition of flavors in your glass.  Mature red fruits, citrus, almonds, a tinge of earthiness and floral notes.   This wine is completely meant to be aged.

Then we moved to the Moët & Chandon Nectar Imperial, a champagne that is the leading seller in the U.S., and is much sweeter than its two counterparts.  I tasted red berry, cream and a bit of raspberry jam.  I understand why it is doing well here, but at that point, the 2008 had captivated my attention.

And back to the champagne flute.  I had to ask why Moët & Chandon was usurping the flute for the white wine glass. Marie answered that there is no way to truly taste the nuances – especially of aged wine in a champagne glass.  I completely concur.


A Tale of Two Cities: Trento to Verona

Charles Dickens started “A Tale of Two Cities” with the famous line, “it was the best of times, it was the worst of times.”  I had my own two city experience with a focus on the best of times where I was hosted by the Italian Trade Commission on a promotional tour with importers, restauranteurs and other supporters of Italian wines.  The Italian Trade Commission has a mission to promote Italian wines with US consumers, drive market share (more than 350 varieties of Italian wine are exported) and conduct trade education events.

The stars aligned for me and I upgraded my flight to London so the 18-total hour trip ending in Venice with the transfer to Trento was a little less hard on the body than I anticipated.

Trento is located in the Adige River Valley in Trentino-Alta Adige/Südtirol in Italy.  The landscape in Trentino includes Lake Garda to the Cevedale Mountain range and includes the Dolomites.  The Trento Denominazione di Origine Controllata (DOC) is an appellation for white and rosé sparkling wine made in Trentino, Italy.  Our exclusive focus was on sparkling, which focused on varieties of Chardonnay, Pinot Noir, and Pinot Meunier all grown in the Province of Trento.  France, the leading provider of champagne and sparkling wines in the world, has a strong connection to the area.  When the chardonnay grapes were brought to the country in 1900 by Giulio Ferrari, Trento was still part of the Austro-Hungarian Empire.  After graduating from the Forschungsanstalt für Garten- und Weinbau in Geisenheim/Rheingau, Germany, Ferrari made champagne in Épernay.

Fast forward to 1984 and the region started a commitment to be recognized with the founding of the Trento DOC Institute.  Nine years later, it was given the DOC status.  Trento DOC produces its sparkling wines in the méthode champenoise style, which means the second fermentation for sparkling must occur in the bottle with old school riddling required along with disgorgement where you freeze a small amount of wine in the neck of the bottle and removie the plug of ice containing the lees.

Our welcome gathering was at the Sartori’s Hotel with a four course menu paired with wine from 12 producers – Abate Nero, Bellaveder, Cantine Ferrari, Cesarino Sforza Spumanti, Letari, Maso Nero, Cantina D’Isera, Cantina Aldeno, Cantina Rovere Della Luna Aichholz, Cesarini Sforza Spumanti, Pisoni and Revi.

We gathered mostly jetlagged – some with lost luggage, some sporting credentials, some with more complex delays than others – all with the end goal of immersing in our experience.  I’m going to talk about our “Breakfast Club group” in a future column – but it was an amazing group of passionate wine folks that covered all stereotypes and defied them all by week end.

 

 

The next day we started at Palazzo Roccabruna, the Chamber of Commerce of Trento’s location, that houses the Enoteca Provinciale del Trentino (the Provincial Wine Promotion Board of Trentino) and is dedicated to the development and promotion of culture, tradition and products of Trentino showcasing the storied wine history of the region.

 

Roberto Anesi, a local wine expert, led us in a master class on eight Trento DOC wines including 2012 Revi Brut Millesimato, 2012 Tananai Brut Borgo dei Posseri, 2011 Maso Martis Dosaggio Zero Riserva, 2010 Cantine Ferrari Perle, 2010 Letrari Brut Riserva, 2009 Cavit Altemasi Riserva Graal, 2008 Cantina Rotaliana di Mezzolombardo Redor Riserva and 2008 Rotari Flavio Riserva.  The region has more than 45 producers and 100 labels.  The terroir is very diverse in climate, soil, weather and temperature.  There were lots of references throughout the two days of the “towering palisades” that are also known as the Dolomites, a mountain range that has a material impact on the region’s weather, grape growing, and how wines are made.

 

 

We then moved to our lunch at Scrigno del Duomo Restaurant, which was located near the historic and original wine cellar and 2,000-year-old door in the old City that came from a column from a Roman church.

 

Our Gracious Tourguide, Daughter Alessandra Stelzer

Our first winery stop was Maso Martis where we got to walk through the vineyards of this second-generation vineyard.  Maso Martis has been making wines since 1986 and is known for its terroir – calcareous soil and Trentino red rock.  Since 2013, the winery has been organically certified and makes 60,000 bottles per year with 45,000 of them dedicated to Trento DOC.  We had a chance to taste four other wineries – Maso Martis, Revi, Borgo del Posseri e Cantina Rotaliana.

Rotari Winemaker Matteo Covazzi

 

Our second winery stop was Rotari – Mezzocorona, which has been making wine since 1987 – with a very different business model of sourcing from more than 1,500 member farmers – many who do this as a second job.  This is a much bigger operation with more than 500,000 bottles hand-picked with a mix of NV and vintage affiliations.  We tried a combination of these wines and I adored the 2008 Rotari Flavio Brut, which has been made since 1998 with an average production of 5,000 to 10,000 bottles.

We returned that night to Palazzo Roccabruna where we were hosted at a dinner showcasing all things Trento DOC including more sparkling wines.

Our morning stop was at Altemasi, which is part of CAVIT’s premium range of sparkling wines focusing on the Methodo Classico winemaking procedure made from grapes from Trento hillsides, the Brentonico plateau and Valle dei Lahi Valley.  The CAVIT winery is quite the production – a four level, highly functioning, high producing and high technology facility.

Export Manager Massimiliano Giacomini

Our last stop before we hit the road to Verona was Ferrari which was led by Brand Ambassador, Jamie Stewart, who was quite the quotable and passionate host for all things Ferrari and the region.  My favorite, “the discovery of champagne was like man discovering fire for the second time.”

Ferrari started with the dream of Guilio Ferrari after working in Champagne France to create a sparkling wine in Trentino with the ability to compete with top French champagnes, which was a vision as none of the champagne grapes were grown in Italy.  He planted Chardonnay in the region and started to produce a few selected bottles with success.  Ferrari did not have an heir for the business so we started a search for the right owner to continue his dream.

He chose Bruno Lunelli, who owned a wine shop and shared the same passion.  The winery has continued to be run by family members and they kept Guilio at the winery until his death in the late 60s.  Today the winery has a large production 4.5 million bottles and are known for its brands — Ferrari Rosé, Ferrari Perlé and Giulio Ferrari Riserva del Fondatore.


Jesse Rodriguez: Sommelier and Renaissance Man Committed to Change the Lives of Others

The Women of EWR

The story of wine is often unpredictable.  This weekend I attended a Leadership Retreat with 40 plus women who are a part of the Dallas Chamber’s Executive Women’s Roundtable.  This is a group of C-level women who are usually the only females sitting in a leadership role in some of the biggest companies in the world.  We come together for this retreat once a year to learn, laugh, network and reconnect with the other women in the room and ourselves.  This year it was at the Montage Palmetto Bluff in Bluffton, South Carolina.

Naturally, wine is a part of this process.  On Friday, we gathered at the River House in the private wine cellar for an amazing dinner.  There I met a true Renaissance man.  Jesse Rodriguez is the Director of Wine and took me for a tour of the cellar, which was amazing and full of hand-selected bottles of boutique and very special wines from around the world.

Because this is a leadership retreat, one of the women asked him a very pointed question about legacy that we had been discussing during the conference.  At that point, we found out the many nuances of Jesse.  He builds the best wine lists in America with a list of coveted awards from the Wine Spectator Grand Award as well as Forbes.com’s “America’s Best Spots for Wine” as well as the first ever nomination for the James Beard Awards Semi-Finalist for Outstanding Wine Service and one of Wine Enthusiast’s “100 Best Wine Restaurants” for two years and the list goes on. He was the Head Sommelier at Napa Valley’s The French Laundry, helping the restaurant become the only dining venue in California to receive a Three Michelin Star rating.

The Menu and Wines from the Dinner

He is relentless in his own learning.  Jesse is an Advanced Sommelier by the American Chapter of the Court of Master Sommeliers, is credentialed as a Certified Wine Educator by the Society of Wine Educators, and has completed the Diploma level through The Wine and Spirits Educational Trust (WSET) and is in his second year of his Masters of Wine certification. Rodriguez was named one of “America’s Best New Sommeliers” by Wine & Spirits magazine in 2007 and one of StarChefs.com’s 2010 “Los Angeles-San Diego Rising Stars.”  He was also named “Best Sommelier” by the readers, editors and critics of San Diego Magazine and Ranch & Coast: San Diego’s luxury lifestyle magazine for four consecutive years.

He’s a teacher – he holds a Master’s in Education in Curriculum and Instruction from Arizona State University, where he also received his undergraduate degree.

And most importantly, he is a kind family man with a passion to give back to the community.  He grew up in Beaumont, California, a Southern California blue collar desert town, the grandson of a Mexican farm worker.  He discovered his passion for wine when waiting tables at the Phoenician Resort in Scottsdale.  Jesse launched a six-month campaign to get a job on the wine team and quickly rose through the ranks.

Once he was making “real money,” he created Figueroa Family Scholarship as a tribute to his grandfather 11 years ago for Mexican American students at Beaumont High.  “I was able to put aside $1,000 and that’s where it all began,” he said.  He personally goes back to Beaumont every year to award the grant.  He also serves as a career-long mentor to those recipients.

He’s a wine maker.  He and his good friend and fellow sommelier, Michael Scafiddi, make pinot noir and cabernet sauvignon under the label Kaizen.

And most importantly, he’s one heck of a nice man with a passion for lifelong learning, the artistry of wine and making the customer feel special.


February: The Month of Just Opening That Bottle(s)

We have all done it.  Spent a ton of time cultivating some great wines in our cellars (or even holding on to a special bottle or two) and then let it sit … and sit … and sit.  Occasionally, when we finally get to that special bottle, it is past its prime and so frustrating to experience.

Chef Mike Smith Explains the Third Course

For me, it’s been an epic month of finally getting to break into the cellar and enjoy some wines that needed to be consumed.  We had a few great opportunities.  First, we had an amazing dinner that we purchased at a North Texas Food Bank auction, an organization that does amazing things to help feed the hungry in DFW.  It was a dinner with well-known chef, Mike Smith, who has a storied career at The Green Room, Arcodoro/Pomodoro and The Common Table before he joined Utopia Food and Fitness, the group who donated the dinner.  They have a great fundraising campaign going right now  – click here to help.

Zach Coffey, Musician

We all brought amazing wines and I’m not going to admit how much wine we consumed, but it was an incredible time with friends who are like the family you would choose, if you could.  We even had a private concert from Zach Coffey, a well-known Texas musician.

For me, it was time to break out a magnum of Reserva Barolo that was off the charts delicious and opened at the perfect moment.   Pol Roger, Gary Farrell, Paul Hobbs and Domaine du Pre Semele were the dinner wines and several were opened after the fact.  It may have been a foggy Sunday, but well worth it.

 

My husband took our daughter on her first ski trip to Vail and I had an opportunity for a girl’s overnight at a friend’s lake house.  She is an amazing cook and consummate entertainer, so we knew we had to bring wines that live up to her culinary skills.  And, well, we did.  There were several of us (I am not going to disclose how many) and work has been a little crazy for all of us.  This was about 30 hours of great food, amazing wine (I got to open another magnum – this time of Tablas Creek Esprit de Tablas).  I also brought Ehlers, Foresight, Naia, Fel, Cartograph, Veuve Clicquot and my friend, Julie, may have brought a few more.  In terms of left overs … well, not so much.  It was Cards Against Humanity (kinda), lots of discussions about life in general, amazing food, Saturday Night Live and old movies.  I even met a person who followed me on Instagram who happened to know Jennifer and came down for a glass of wine.

And, I got to bring our new rescue pup who did well except for his walkabout when we were cleaning up on Sunday morning.

After all, what good is keeping great wines in the cellar if you don’t share them with good friends?

 


The Allstate Sugar Bowl: A Tale of Two Conferences, Wine and the Big Easy Experience

The Ofenloch and Stewart Families (thank you, Ed….)

This story involves wine, amazing food, dear friends, family, unrestricted access and a team that I love.  The backdrop of the story is in New Orleans – yes, the Big Easy – and the focus was Auburn University (my alma mater) playing The University of Oklahoma in the Sugar Bowl.  It was also a time to teach my 11-year-old daughter about winning and losing, being appreciative, enjoying the New Orleans experience and food (and yes, off of Bourbon Street, she’s 11….) and trying to instill in her that this was indeed a life experience and not how her parents experienced football in college.

We met two sets of good friends at the airport in Dallas.  One has an executive role with the Big 12 and he was the genie that granted access that would make a rock star jealous.  The others were our new neighbors who are very active and avid OU fans.  We pretty much were the only Auburn people on the plane and after the fifth round of “Boomer Sooner,” I had to let out a loud War Eagle.  Proud parent moment with my kiddo when she stood up and did it even louder.  It was one of those agree to disagree moments with our friends, but Morgan’s fearlessness made us all proud.

We arrived on New Year’s Eve and promptly went to Frankie and Johnny’s for a late lunch.  There the gluttony began as we sampled most of what the restaurant offers along with rounds of gin and tonics.  The food was great!

That took us through to the big gala party on New Year’s Eve, where we opened a bottle of the Laurent-Perrier Cuvee Rose Champagne, which is billed as the most recognized rosé champagne in the world, as our pre-celebration.  This is such a great champagne, which is still made in the saignee method and whose bottle was inspired by King Henri IV.  It was vibrant, rich and wonderful with notes of berry, brioche, cherry and cassis.  It was absolutely the right start to bring in a new year.

John and Ed

Me and Amy

 Angie and Jay Jacobs, me and John

 

The party was amazing — it was a who’s who in the conference football world, the oysters and seafood were flowing and I was dancing my butt off (my favorite thing to do, but usually only happens once a year).  And, then we got the kiddo call around 11.  She wanted us to be back at the hotel with her when the ball dropped.  So, reluctantly, we made the good parent decision and decided that opening that bottle of 2013 Ehlers Estate J Leducq would ease the pain.  We complied and continued to drink wine back in the room.  This is a wine blog, what else did you expect?

Janice and Melanie, Big 12 Women That Make Things Happen, Amy and me

 Let’s Just Say There is a Reason I Outsource Crafts

 

The next morning, January 1st, I had the chance to be a part of the ladies Sugar Bowl event, where we met at Pat O’Briens, decorated our umbrellas and marched down Bourbon Street to a private lunch at Arnaud’s.  I had to clandestinely hide my Auburn paraphernalia as I decorated with the Big 12 folks, but they were incredibly gracious and made me feel right at home.  We went to an Auburn party later that afternoon where I got to see some of my dearest college friends (naturally I forgot to take pictures) and their families and later met up with John’s family for dinner.

The next day we received a surprise text from Auburn.  In the spirit of full disclosure, I am on the PR Advisory Council for the School and work very closely with Athletic Director, Jay Jacobs and his very talented marketing/communications team.  “Good morning. I would like for you to sit in the suite with my family.  Would you like to do that?”  I was in the gym and tried to refrain from jumping up in down with 12 pound weights in my hands.  Of course, we immediately jumped on the opportunity.

Since we went to the gym, we opened a bottle of the Côté Mas St. Hilarie Crémant de Limoux NV Brut, for our walk to Peche because we were in a celebratory mode.  It was a great under $15 sparkling with notes of green apple, toast and citrus.  Very drinkable, very affordable.  Definitely something a divided table of Auburn and OU fans could agree upon.  That may have been my favorite meal in New Orleans.

Ashley, one of my dear college friends, and me

It was important to pay the suite generosity forward, so I sent out a text to some friends asking if anyone could use our tickets.  A great friend responded that she really could use them so I had the chance to run into her as well while we had an amazing lunch at Pesce.  The oysters and 2015 Domain Girard Sancerre pairing will run through my dreams for a long time.

Our Super Talented Bus Driver Breaks It Down While We Wait for Our Police Escort (seriously, did I just type that?)

 

Me, the aforementioned 11 year old daughter, and John

The game was a blur.  We boarded our bus to the game with the Big 12 folks where we were serenated by our very talented bus driver while we waited for our police escort, which was late.  We then went to the Auburn side of the pre-game party and ran into some old friends along the way.  The suite was amazing and it was fun to see my kiddo get into the game and have a great time.  We were up in the first quarter and things were looking good until our quarterback broke his arm.  At that point, the game momentum shifted.

We stayed until the end, got back on the escorted bus and ended up in the Big 12/OU lounge with lots of happy fans for the other team.  They were incredibly kind, the drinks were flowing and it was an awesome lesson for our daughter on how to be a good loser.  She even had her own Big 12 badge as reinforcement, but was definitely ready with a good “War Eagle” at any time.




twitter dallaswinechick
facebook Dallas Wine Chick
Email
RSS Feed
© 2010 www.DallasWineChick.com